LegalStatusDiversity

When I was growing up I did not like the word diversity, or, more specifically I did not like hearing that diversity was something an institution should seek. I thought it was code for affirmative action in its worst form–admission standards would be lowered to allow people who looked like me to be admitted to places that would have been beyond our capacity to attain. How wrong I was! When I attended my high status college I docovered that there is indeed another half, as privileged group whose existence I never truly grasped. Discovering how the other half lived was an education itself. In fact there are many other halves, people who differ from me in personal identification, race, gender, hometown. I propose acknowledgement of another type of diversity: people with different life experiences. I have been at one of the highest echelons of society as a top graduate of a prestigious university. I have occupied the lowest rung on the societal ladder when I was shackled to the next women, bring transported to jail pre-trial because I did not possess $1,100 in cash for bail and no one in my life had that kind of money. The people I met in both situations were fascinating. The lesson I learned, one of them, is that few people have had these experiences. As an educated Escort I had been around in such a way try hat made me unique. But I predict my singular status will change to that of a person who is prt of a group. The unprecedented opiate epidemic has cut a swath through populations that erroneously believed they were immune to something immoral like addiction. Now people should see the war on drugs is a war on US, not THEM. Addiction is bring repackaged as an illness, and not a badness. Yet society still utilizes the criminal justice system to deal we with drug addiction. A huge population cohort is emerging (I have no data but I am intuiting this claim) that will be locked out of the workforce due to felony convictions. Many more escorts will be educated as they head down the path toward a felony or after conviction. We are going to have to embrace a diversity of legal status in settings previously closed to ex offenders. Otherwise we will have a lot of disenfranchised people permanently stationed as a new underclass. The only “career” options will be minimum wage jobs or perhaps lateral moves to other stigmatized or perhaps illegal means of support, and sobriety won’t help United States get unstuck. What do we do, we who are without family money and who have screwed up too much to have attained independent wealth. The year 2017 draws to a close. You, my Reader you may not care on a personal level about the proliferation of felonies at the time of this writing. However, I am quite certain that before too much longer you, I mean we, will feel the impact

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Published by X-Streetwalker Turned Sex Talker

Caroleena used to be a drug addicted hooker on streets of downtown Honolulu in the early years of the 21st century. She was not the only learned streetwalker among the sex worker addicts. This group would have been a liberal college admissions officer's dream of diversity seeing as how they represented such a wide range of ages, races, family types, locations of origin, education levels, and gender identities. The two constants were trauma and dependency. Everyone out there had experienced life altering trauma which spurred them to seek refuge in drugs. Addiction was the unexpected phenomenon that kept them stuck in the dope. This downtown area was different from other drug saturated areas of America in one important way. The U.S. is the most violent country in the world, but in this corner of the nation there were no street gangs, no gun violence. You wouldn't get shot but you were probably going to be beaten up and robbed at some point. Interpersonal violence between intimate partners, friends, and family members was viewed as a natural part of being close to people. "Domestics" was something an individual brought upon herself or himself by causing problems in an interpersonal relationship. Caroleena, the perennial pariah even among society's rejects, had no intimate associates who might harm her. Prostitution was not as risky on Oahu as it was most everywhere else because the island was just too small. Everyone was somehow connected to everyone else with only something like two degrees of separation. You commit a crime, someone will know who you are and someone else will know how to find you. Hookers rarely got killed. Honolulu's relative safety allowed Caroleena over 10 years of street longevity until the scene ended when authorities started arresting men for allegedly soliciting undercover police for sex and posting their pictures on the evening news. ExpertEscort2018.com/ tells Caroleena's adventures during her decade of addiction and its consequences--homelessness, prostitution, drug dealing, incarceration, family destruction, the list goes on. Every story relates events Caroleena experienced, witnessed, or imagined. The tale of this outcast is skillfully and paradoxically told in the language of the elite. The wording of the posts is itself a testimony to the wide grip that addiction has on all levels of society, even impacting the privileged who were previously thought to be immune to the troubles of the lower class. During these days of opiate addiction maybe she can answer some questions and present applicable solutions. If not, you are still in for a hell of a good read.

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