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Addiction and Prostitution in Hawaii

Addiction Myth: People Have to Be Ready for Treatment to Work.See YouTube Link W/ Real Addicts

I know exactly what is going to be said before someone says it. Am I psychic? Maybe just telepathic when it comes to addicts? Not exactly. Addiction is a kind of brain disorder that creates delusions. People believe things about reality that are demonstrably false, but they hold fast to their beliefs because their brain, under the influende of drugs, is convinced a falsehood is true. For example, the brand new drug user, two weeks into trying crack or heroin or ice says, “I am not like the rest of these people. No way would I ever turn a trick to get money for drugs.” I know the person will say this. I know that this statement will prove to be false. I have been fortunate enough to be around a lot of drug users, while they are clean and while they are using because I have been incarcerated and to treatment. I know the patterns. I have learned that people say exactly the same false things, with no awareness that what they are saying will turn out not to be true. They do not even know they won’t keep their word. Because they do not know addiction, and because drugs have a predictable effect on the brain. Unlike schizophrenia, delusions are not different for each person, but the same thinking patterns take over everyone’s mind. It is extraordinary, really, to be able to predict what strangers will do and say with incredible accuracy

FALSE: People have to be ready to quit for treatment to be successful. The first reason this statement is false is that treatment is for the most part, unsuccessful. Any rehab facility that could promise a 10% success rate would become the first rehab facility to make a billion dollars. You are more likely to recover from cancer than you are to recover from drug addiction. Having established that we are talking about a success rate, if we look at people still clean one year after finishing treatment, of what…? One or two percent. Ok, take the one or two percent and dealing with those people I will state categorically that they did not have to be willing to enter treatment to stop using. First of all, we remember all that we are taught about drugs and behavior and although we may not apply it, the knowledge is still there, available to us when we are ready to use it. Just because someone does not stay clean does not mean the education was totally lost. It is simply dormant knowledge. Second. the brain is convinced through the demon of addiction that we don’t really have a problem, not like those serious cases we can think of, and we just know we do not need help. We might want it, but we will categorically deny we need it, and we believe we are speaking truth. But the truth is, unless we are locked up in some fashion, we are not going to stop. Yes, it will take physical restraint for an addict to get time away from using. Very few do it on their own, by themselves, by doing something different with their day, even when no one is watching. No one is ever ready to be locked up, be it treatment, detox, a psych ward, or a correctional facility. Sure people will cavaleirly say, yes, you can chain my to the bed, because that’s what it will take. But you better believe we would be gnawing on that chain with our teeth like a rat in a trap as soon as the craving took hold in mind and body. I speak literally, not figuratively. Yes, we would try to gnaw through the ties that bound us if we thought we could get away and get high.

the time away from the drug, involuntary though it necessarily is, will help. I cannot tell you why almost everyone returns to using after a period of sobriety, I can only say for sure that they do not have to have a voluntary start to keep going down the sober road.

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In Hawaii go to rehab, volunteer for welfare

Just bc they take food stamps doesn’t make them cheapDrug Treatment Centers

You’ve hear the expression, just bc you can buy it at Walmart doesn’t make it cheap. Same goes for rehab, or treatment, as they call it here. Addiction very often involves taking a metaphorical flame thrower to your finances, so many addicts have nothing. On day 1 of sobriety, It’s common to be as broke as you were as a high school grad, just starting out in the working world. And even if you weren’t destiTunes, it’s likely the family has money and not the person with the addiction. The very first thing to get squared away is getting the addict on welfare with the accompanying insurance through Medicaid. That’s where the big money is. The state will pay for six months in patient treatment and that’s how programs determine your length of stay. But programs don’t stop there. They also take each persons financial benefits (if you’re in drug treatment your disability is covered by welfare bc the money didn’t go to the addict. Finally, the addict signs over all of the food stamps to the program, which Is Loophole in the law because food stamps are supposed to be for the sole use of the beneficiary. Very few people in Hawaii, with its high cost of living and low salaries in very few industries could afford to pay for treatment out of pocket.

I never thought I would be on welfare

The first time I went to treatment I asked if I should maintain my cleaning service, as in maybe I could have the lady come to clean my room at the program. I remember the administrator looking at me with a mixture of surprise, pity, and irritation. “You’re going to be on welfare. You won’t be able to afford a cleaning service.” I had no idea welfare was a requirement.

The drug treatment system perpetuates poverty in Hawaii

Hawaii, like the mainland United States, has a serious drug problem except the main dug of choice, as they tell us to sat, is crystal meth. Ice, is what they call it here. It’s very popular among the locals, or people who call Hawaii home because they were born in Hawaii have been here a long time. Local is also another way to say brown skinned, Polynesian, although no one is really one ethnicity but a mix. Anyway, many of the people doing ice are local. They have just about the worst public schools in the country. Many people start doing ice at a young age and already impoverished, and undereducated, through no fault of their own. Eventually many users get caught because once you lose your place you’re out in public where you can be seen using. Or they break the law to support their habit. I am not saying addicts are not responsible for breaking the law, I am just saying what happens in the life cycle of the addict. People go to treatment most often after getting a “nudge from the judge.” Go to treatment or go to jail.

Drug Treatment gets people more enmeshed in drugs and poverty

There in treatment, they stagnate financially, maintaining that $0 balance. No paying job, the little money they get all goes to the program, every dime, along with the insurance money.All of the programs put the residents to work maintaining the program, in the kitchen or light janitorial work. Unpaid. If they are successful they end up being hired by the program. Low paid. Programs get around the minimum wage requirement by giving “stipends” not paying salary. The recovering addict, if he does everything right, still qualifies for welfare. One two and a half year program that works its residents within its for two out of two and a half years, graduates success stories who have saved all of $300 after 24 months of labor. This program raked in tens of thousands from the insurance, welfare, food stamps, and unpaid labor. None of this money ever went into a trust for residents, for post graduate expenses.

Graduates of drug treatment have little choice but to stay within the ranks of the poor since poor is what they are. The recommended course immediately upon graduation by moving into “clean and sober houses.”

Putting the “high” in high risk

When you add grinding poverty with the knowledge that there’s a sure way to make lots of money quickly you get a recipe for relapse. I always wonder if people can demonstrate systemic inequities. This brief look at how treatment programs in Hawaii shows how people are made to apply for welfare (that’s where the hefty insurance money is), and that application from a treatment center is automated approved. This automatic approval is a government subsidy in addition to any other funding from health and human services. Treatment keeps them on welfare while the residents work for the program. We see a system set up to profit treatment centers if there is a steady stream of addicted people mandated to go into programs. These drug treatment programs have no proven efficacy beyond a few individuals who tell their stories. Any medical treatment with a relapse rate over 90% would not be embraced. So what’s the answer Caroleena? I have a few ideas to help people financially transition to a regular life.